5 notes

(Source: timeisaflatcircus)

668 notes

Preview

0 notes

nprmusic:

The Detroit band Death spent a chunk of the ’70s making vital music that went mostly unheard for decades. Death III helps paint a picture of a group that deserves its new-found place in rock history.
Stream Death III from NPR Music’s First Listen. 

nprmusic:

The Detroit band Death spent a chunk of the ’70s making vital music that went mostly unheard for decades. Death III helps paint a picture of a group that deserves its new-found place in rock history.

Stream Death III from NPR Music’s First Listen

85 notes

#beforethestorm  recording

#beforethestorm recording

0 notes

Dog makes weird sounds

0 notes

(Source: glitter-glob, via sharpless)

2,201 notes

(Source: geekyandgory, via sharpless)

10,954 notes

are2:

Skate of Die

bad ass

are2:

Skate of Die

bad ass

82 notes

"When I say I am opposed to war I mean ruling class war, for the ruling class is the only class that makes war. … Capitalists’ wars for capitalist conquest and capitalist plunder must be fought by the capitalists themselves so far as I am concerned, and upon that question, there can be no compromise and no misunderstanding as to my position. I have no country to fight for; my country is the earth; I am a citizen of the world. I would not violate my principles for God, much less for a crazy kaiser, a savage czar, a degenerate king, or a gang of pot-bellied parasites. I am opposed to every war but one; I am for the war with heart and soul, and that is the worldwide war of social revolution. In that war, I am prepared to fight in any way the ruling class may make necessary."

Eugene Debs, “When I Shall Fight" in the Appeal to Reason newspaper, September 11, 1915. (via fortunenglory)

(via cognitivedissonance)

149 notes

animalcell:

recalled pencils from a 90’s anti drug campaign

animalcell:

recalled pencils from a 90’s anti drug campaign

(Source: reddlr-trees, via sharpless)

171,938 notes

i really think the worst thing you can be is oblivious 

0 notes

"

50 years ago, America’s biggest employer was General Motors, where workers made the modern equivalent of $50 dollars an hour. Today, America’s biggest employer is Walmart, where the average wage is eight dollars an hour.

… And Walmart released their annual report this month, and in it was the fact that most of what Walmart sells is food. And most of their customers need food stamps to pay for it. Meanwhile, Walmart’s owners are so absurdly rich that one of them, Alice Walton, spent over a billion dollars building an art museum in Bentonville, Arkansas… And she said about it, “For years I’ve been thinking about what we can do as a family that can really make a difference.” How about giving your employees a raise, you deluded nitwit?

"

BILL MAHERReal Time

(Source: inothernews, via cognitivedissonance)

6,526 notes

"

Roderick: “The thing is, when you’re a musician, a lot of people who work jobs in the straight world - actually, people of all stripes - are constantly trying to tell you how much your job itself is its own reward. Like, ‘Oh, wow, touring is so great! You’re so lucky! And money has to just be, like, so far down the list of your motivations because you get to travel, you get to play your music for people…I’m super grateful that people spend so much time telling me all the reasons why I should be glad that I’m not getting paid for various things. The best people at that are, of course, the promoters for the show, or the people who run your record label.”

Mann: “They understand how valuable publicity is.”

Roderick: “Yeah, they understand how valuable it is that you be convinced that the three free beers they put in your dressing room are adequate compensation for you having driven eight hours to play the show.”

"

(Source: tomorrowville, via sharpless)

25 notes

assangistan:

via anarcho-queer:

WikiLeaks: Obama Administration Pressured Haiti’s President To Lower Minimum Wage
A Wikileaks post published on The Nation shows that the Obama Administration fought to keep Haitian wages at 31 cents an hour.
Contractors for Fruit of the Loom, Hanes and Levi’s worked in close concert with the US Embassy when they aggressively moved to block a minimum wage increase for Haitian assembly zone workers, the lowest-paid in the hemisphere, according to secret State Department cables.
It started when Haiti passed a law two years ago raising its minimum wage to 61 cents an hour. According to an embassy cable:
This infuriated American corporations like Hanes and Levi Strauss that pay Haitians slave wages to sew their clothes. They said they would only fork over a seven-cent-an-hour increase, and they got the State Department involved. The U.S. ambassador put pressure on Haiti’s president, who duly carved out a $3 a day minimum wage for textile companies (the U.S. minimum wage, which itself is very low, works out to $58 a day).
Haiti has about 25,000 garment workers. If you paid each of them $2 a day more, it would cost their employers $50,000 per working day, or about $12.5 million a year … As of last year Hanes had 3,200 Haitians making t-shirts for it. Paying each of them two bucks a day more would cost it about $1.6 million a year. Hanesbrands Incorporated made $211 million on $4.3 billion in sales last year.
Thanks to U.S. intervention, the minimum was raised only to 31 cents.
The revelation of US support for low wages in Haiti’s assembly zones was in a trove of 1,918 cables made available to the Haitian weekly newspaper Haïti Liberté by the transparency group WikiLeaks. As part of a collaboration with Haïti Liberté, The Nation is publishing English-language articles based on those cables.

assangistan:

via anarcho-queer:

WikiLeaks: Obama Administration Pressured Haiti’s President To Lower Minimum Wage

A Wikileaks post published on The Nation shows that the Obama Administration fought to keep Haitian wages at 31 cents an hour.

Contractors for Fruit of the Loom, Hanes and Levi’s worked in close concert with the US Embassy when they aggressively moved to block a minimum wage increase for Haitian assembly zone workers, the lowest-paid in the hemisphere, according to secret State Department cables.

It started when Haiti passed a law two years ago raising its minimum wage to 61 cents an hour. According to an embassy cable:

This infuriated American corporations like Hanes and Levi Strauss that pay Haitians slave wages to sew their clothes. They said they would only fork over a seven-cent-an-hour increase, and they got the State Department involved. The U.S. ambassador put pressure on Haiti’s president, who duly carved out a $3 a day minimum wage for textile companies (the U.S. minimum wage, which itself is very low, works out to $58 a day).

Haiti has about 25,000 garment workers. If you paid each of them $2 a day more, it would cost their employers $50,000 per working day, or about $12.5 million a year … As of last year Hanes had 3,200 Haitians making t-shirts for it. Paying each of them two bucks a day more would cost it about $1.6 million a year. Hanesbrands Incorporated made $211 million on $4.3 billion in sales last year.

Thanks to U.S. intervention, the minimum was raised only to 31 cents.

The revelation of US support for low wages in Haiti’s assembly zones was in a trove of 1,918 cables made available to the Haitian weekly newspaper Haïti Liberté by the transparency group WikiLeaks. As part of a collaboration with Haïti Liberté, The Nation is publishing English-language articles based on those cables.

(via cognitivedissonance)

4,472 notes